Ganzach Kiddush Hashem News

Ambassadors of European Union Member Countries Visit Ganzach Kiddush Hashem

Online Exhibitions

Yizkor – Memorialization

Memory and Identity

Ganzach Kiddush Hashem News

All of Israel are Responsible for One Another

Ganzach Kiddush Hashem News

Shake Yourself Free, Rise from the Dust – Study Day

Ganzach Kiddush Hashem News

“In Order That You May Tell it to Future Generations” (Psalms 48:14)

Online Exhibitions

From the Depths I Called Out to You

Before you is a collection of stories, photographs, and testimonies from the archives of Ganzach Kiddush Hashem, which tell the stories of Jews who did not surrender to the cruel reality and tried to preserve, even to some extent, with the possibility of praying to their G-d.

Ganzach Kiddush Hashem News

In Light of the Difficult Circumstances Facing Our People and Our Country

Online Exhibitions

Mutual Responsibility

Video Testimonies

With the support of the Ministry of Culture and Sport, the Claims Conference, the Estate Department, and the Holocaust Restitution Organization, Ganzach Kiddush Hashem collects testimonies by a team of skilled researchers specially trained for this task.

The Future Museum

Ganzach Kiddush Hashem sees the future museum as a tool to expand and deepen knowledge and awareness on the subject of the Holocaust, while emphasizing the Jewish religious response and manifestations of spiritual resistance under Nazi persecution.

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Founder of Ganzach Kiddush Hashem

Rabbi Moshe Prager

The Holocaust author and research, and founder of Ganzach Kiddush Hashem, Rabbi Moshe Prager, was born in Poland in 5669 (1909) and passed away in Israel in 5745 (1984). The well-known author lived in the three worlds that Ganzach Kiddush Hashem strives to commemorate. He saw European Jewry flourishing prewar, witnessed the terrible destruction of the Holocaust, and merited to see a new generation rise from the ashes. Rabbi Prager felt that he was like a bridge between the ages, connected the past that was destroyed with the current and future generations. While many of the survivors were only able to speak about the atrocities many years after the events, Rabbi Moshe Prager delved into the subject immediately after the Nazi invasion of Poland. Even during the war, Rabbi Prager strove to smuggle documents abroad about the annihilation. He understood the enormous importance of documentation and the preservation of memory and considered it to be his life mission until the day he died. After the Holocaust, Rabbi Prager engaged in all forms of documentation and commemoration: He wrote books, stories, and articles which became cornerstones of Holocaust literature. The highlight of his activities was the establishment of Ganzach Kiddush Hashem. While Rabbi Prager managed to escape and settle in Israel, his entire family and community were murdered by the Nazis. His memories lived within him at all times, as he elaborated upon in one of his poems: “Every evening I burn in the furnaces, and every morning I emerge from them alive and well.”

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